Greek unemployment down to 23.1 percent in April – June, still worst jobless rate in EU

A protester holds a flare during an anti-austerity demonstration in the northern port city of Thessaloniki, Greece, where Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras is due to speak at the 81th Thessaloniki International Trade Fair on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2016. About 15,000 protesters are taking part in anti-government rallies before a visit to Greece by bailout inspectors and plans by the left-wing government to impose more austerity measures after years of economic hardship. (AP Photo/Giannis Papanikos)
A protester holds a flare during an anti-austerity demonstration in the northern port city of Thessaloniki, Greece, where Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras is due to speak at the 81th Thessaloniki International Trade Fair on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2016. About 15,000 protesters are taking part in anti-government rallies before a visit to Greece by bailout inspectors and plans by the left-wing government to impose more austerity measures after years of economic hardship. (AP Photo/Giannis Papanikos)

ATHENS, Greece (AP) – Unemployment in bailout-dependent Greece dropped to 23.1 percent between April and June, down from nearly 25 percent in the first quarter but still the worst jobless rate in the European Union.

The country’s statistical authority said Thursday that a total 1.1 million people were without a job in the second quarter, while 3.7 million were employed.

After Greece’s public finances fell apart in early 2010 and the country signed the first of three multi-billion euro bailouts, unemployment hit levels unseen during peacetime in recent Greek history.

However, the rate generally has been going down since it approached a high of 28 percent in early 2014.

Greece’s left-wing government is in negotiations with its bailout creditors over term reforms that would secure it a 2.8-billion euro ($3.15 billion) loan installment.

 

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