Voters will remember ‘nasty, personal side’ of election

election-memories

PORTLAND, Ore. (KOIN) — Just 2 weeks before election night, KOIN 6 News’ resident political expert Jim Moore weighed in on the issues most pressing to Oregonians.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speak during the second presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Sunday, Oct. 9, 2016. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speak during the second presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Sunday, Oct. 9, 2016. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Despite the negativity of both presidential candidate’s campaigns, Moore said he believes the race was decided years ago. He predicted a Democrat would win no matter who ran.

“The Republican generic candidate started out at 206 electoral college votes,” Moore explained. “So if all the leaners came in, they were going to have to win Ohio, Pennsylvania and Florida to win, which is virtually impossible to do.”

In Oregon, the political analyst said former Governor John Kitzhaber’s resignation changed the landscape of races ranging from governor to Portland’s mayor.

“Kitzhaber, in effect, got new players in the game, gave them new roles and moved the clock up,” he said. “So the result is, Ted Wheeler is going to be Mayor of Portland.”

The resignation also affected Bud Pierce’s campaign for governor, Moore said, explaining that the candidate had to move his plans up by 2 years.

“Taking on an incumbent governor is tough,” Moore said.

And Moore’s pick for the closest candidate race on the ballot? Secretary of State.

“Richardson… ran as a Republican for governor and Brad Avakian who served basically 8 years as labor commissioner, a non-partisan position, but he’s a Democrat,” he said. “Both of them have ways they want to change the office.”

Measure 97, which would raise taxes on the largest corporations in Oregon, is too close to call. But Moore said numbers on the “yes” side of the polls have gone down.

Ballots must be received or dropped off by 8 p.m. Tuesday, November 8.

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