Dakota Access developer denounces easement delay

FILE PHOTO - In this Nov. 2, 2016 file photo, protesters demonstrating against the expansion of the Dakota Access Pipeline wade in cold creek waters confronting local police as remnants of pepper spray waft over the crowd near Cannon Ball, N.D. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says it's trying to diffuse tensions between pipeline protesters and law enforcement in North Dakota, but that the pipeline's developer isn't cooperating. (AP Photo/John L. Mone, File)
FILE PHOTO - In this Nov. 2, 2016 file photo, protesters demonstrating against the expansion of the Dakota Access Pipeline wade in cold creek waters confronting local police as remnants of pepper spray waft over the crowd near Cannon Ball, N.D. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says it's trying to diffuse tensions between pipeline protesters and law enforcement in North Dakota, but that the pipeline's developer isn't cooperating. (AP Photo/John L. Mone, File)

CANNON BALL, N.D. (AP) – The Latest on protests against the Dakota Access oil pipeline. (all times local):

8:40 a.m. – The company building the $3.8 billion Dakota Access oil pipeline is denouncing a decision by the Army Corps of Engineers to delay an easement to cross a Missouri River reservoir in North Dakota.

Energy Transfer Partners CEO Kelcy Warren said in a statement Monday that the decision is “motivated purely by politics at the expense of a company that has done nothing but play by the rules.”

The Corps wants more studies and tribal input before it decides whether to allow the pipeline to cross under Lake Oahe. The Standing Rock Sioux says the pipeline threatens drinking water and cultural sites. Protests have been ongoing for months.

ETP says it will “vigorously pursue its legal rights.”

The 1,200-mile pipeline from North Dakota to Illinois is largely complete outside of the river crossing.

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8 a.m. – The Standing Rock Sioux chairman says the decision by the Army Corps of Engineers to delay an easement for the $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline indicates protests against the project are succeeding.

The Corps said Monday it needs more studies and tribal input before it can decide whether to allow the oil pipeline to cross under a Missouri River reservoir in North Dakota. The tribe says the pipeline would threaten drinking water and cultural sites. Protests against its construction have been ongoing for months.

Chairman Dave Archambault said in a statement that the Corps’ decision is encouraging and shows the demonstrations are bringing the tribe’s concerns to light.

An industry group supporting the pipeline criticized the Corps’ decision. The MAIN Coalition called it an attempt at “death by delay.”

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6:15 a.m. – Robert F. Kennedy Jr. is slated to join protesters of the Dakota Access pipeline in North Dakota.

Also Tuesday, activists have called for demonstrators to protest at Army Corps of Engineers offices and offices of banks that are financing the pipeline project. The protesters want President Barack Obama to permanently halt the construction of the $3.8 billion pipeline.

Kennedy is an environmental attorney and president of the New York-based Waterkeeper Alliance, which seeks to protect watersheds worldwide.

The pipeline is to run beneath a Missouri River reservoir in North Dakota that provides drinking water to the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, which says the pipeline threatens drinking water and cultural sites.

The pipeline would deliver oil from North Dakota through South Dakota and Iowa to a shipping point in Illinois.

 

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